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Orange Whipped Cream (no pic, but it’s still good)

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Whipped Cream

Whipped Cream

When it comes to sponge cake, I usually serve individual slices with whipped cream and gently macerated berries. The juice from the berries soaks into the cake, creating a wonderful mix of texture and flavor. The whipped cream is lighter than frosting, which I feel is appropriate for sponge cake.

Anyhow, if you want to make the lemon cake recipe I posted earlier with oranges (orange cake then…), here’s a nice recipe for an orange whipped cream.

Recipe follows:

Essentially, this recipe is for a flavoured and sweetened whipped cream.

Recipe

Stuff you’ll need:

  • juice of 2 oranges
  • zest of the now juice-less oranges (actually, it would probably be easier to zest first, then juice)
  • 1/2 cup of whipping cream (chilled)
  • 4 tbsp of powdered sugar
  • 2 cups of ice (more hardware than ingredient…)

Prep:

  1. Juice and zest two oranges, preferably sweet ones. Finely chop the orange zest. There is nothing worse than taking a dollop of whipped cream and chewing a piece of zest.
  2. Either purchase or produce powdered sugar. Of course, I don’t mean refine sugar from beets (mmm..a by product would be treacle) or sugarcane. However, if you take granulated sugar and pulse it in a food processor for 2 minutes, you’re going to produce powdered sugar. Thank-you Alton Brown :)
  3. Take two metal bowls, one that fits into the other and place them into the fridge for an hour or two

Method:

  1. Pour the orange juice into a heavy bottomed sauce pan and heat on medium until simmering
  2. Lower the heat to low and continue simmering until the juice is reduced by half. We are refining orange flavor.
  3. Take the reduced liquid off the heat and let cool completely.
  4. Put ice into one chilled bowl and place the other on top.
  5. Add whipping cream and whip with either a balloon whisk or an electric beater until the cream starts to thicken. If using an electric beater, chill the blades along with the bowl.
  6. Gently add the sugar and reduced orange juice.
  7. Beat mixture until it forms peaks.

Server immediately.

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Mild-mannered IT professional by day and food blogger by night, I founded foodiePrints with a single intention, to share my love of all things food. My first post shared a recipe. Many followed. Eventually, I learned Ottawa prepares and serves great food. Thereafter, I started meeting restaurateurs, chefs, cooks, farmers, and other local producers, all good people. Ideas for food-related content swirled in my head. foodiePrints grew into a place to put them. From exploring foreign and domestic cuisines to shopping for exotic ingredients and cobbling together my takes on dishes in my meager kitchen, there are stories to tell. Welcome to foodiePrints. Here, you will find stories about food and drink, cooking, and eating in Canada’s capital. Be it food-related or just food-for-thought, I hope you find something tasty here.