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Case Study Jam at the Lindenhof – updated

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Towards the end of February, I attended a Thursday session of Case Study Jam at German restaurant, the Lindenhof, on Preston Street (268) in Ottawa’s Little Italy. It would be the second time creator Joe Boughner convened the event. Dubbed “Case Study Jam 2: Jamming Harder”, Case Study Jam gathers together “do-ers”, people who work in public relations, communications, or information technology, essentially “anyone who gets their hands dirty.” According to the event’s primer, while there is no featured speaker, several quick oral presentations start the event, leading to break off discussions on “Wins” (success case studies), “Fails” (less-than-successful case studies), and “Works in Progress” (ongoing case studies). The goal is to encourage people to share ideas and allow attendees to leverage lessons learned, all in an informal environment.

That evening’s presenters follow:

Because the event was held at the Lindenhof, Boughner encouraged attendees to come early to enjoy “a schnitzel or a bratwurst” before the presenters spoke.

Having read several past tweets from local tweeps about their enjoying great dinners at the restaurant, both when it was previously on Carling and at its new location on Preston, I arrived early to sample some German fare. I however polled some trustworthy sources beforehand. One of the project managers I work with is of German decent. He told me the Lindenhof can be a little unpredictable, he having been served both great and forgettable plates. Never regrettable, he warned me to expect large servings. A friend told me there are better German restaurants in Ottawa.

The event was held in the second floor dining room of the restaurant. The Lindenhof, itself, looked like a converted two story house. With hardwood floors, yellow painted walls, and dark wood accents, the atmosphere matched the generous home-style dishes we were served.

Second Floor Bar

Second Floor Bar

Even the bar looked warm and welcoming.

Off the menu, I ordered the sauerbraten in lieu of either schnitzel or bratwurst. A former colleague of mine once asked me if I had come across the vinegar marinated beef dish in my local restaurant adventures.

Lindenhof Menu

Lindenhof Menu

Entrees

Entrees

Described as “cured and marinated roast beef, served with a tender potato dumpling and sauteed vegetables”, I wasn’t about to pass up the opportunity. I did take note of the schnitzel though…

Schnitzel

Schnitzel

Boughner recommended the combined bratwurst and schnitzel plate. His German beer recommend: Warsteiner Dunkel.

Warsteiner Dunkel

Warsteiner Dunkel

Every entree is accompanied with either salad or soup.

That evening's Salad

That evening’s Salad

That evening's Soup

That evening’s Soup

Ian ordered the salad and graciously let me take a picture of it. I ordered the soup. Thin brothed, peppery, and slightly over seasoned, the vegetable soup tasted of tomato and was forgettable.

My sauerbraten plate was indeed generous.

Sauerbraten

Sauerbraten

The sliced beef bordered on tough, but was manageable with the savory jus-based gravy. The potato dumpling is the largest I have ever come across. When it arrived, I thought it was a scoop of mashed potato. Expecting something yielding, my fork cut into a tender dumpling that paired well with the sliced beef. The vegetables tasted steamed and finished in butter. They were fork tender. The entire plate was rustic and filling.

Arriving at the restaurant ravenous, my dinner quickly filled the gap, allowing me to enjoy the following presentations.

Total: $25.43 (including a Coke ($2.50), a coffee, and taxes).

I would later speak with Bob LeDrew about encouraging members of Ottawa’s foodie and food blog community (over 50 blogs strong) to come together and help him hold another dinner for the Cornerstone women’s shelter. His idea: a chili or stew dinner. My thoughts: Ottawa has a vibrant foodie community with food enthusiasts who defy author Michael Ruhlman’s thoughts that foodies don’t cook. Jenn later suggested to include a canned food drive for the Food Bank as well. More on this later.

Many thanks to the Lindenhof for hosting Case Study Jam. Many thanks to Joe Boughner, the presenters, and the attendees for some insightful discussion. I am excited to attend the next one.

Here are some of the business cards I gathered from the evening.

Kelly Rusk and Bob Ledrew

Kelly Rusk and Bob Ledrew

Avra Gibbs Lamey and Mar Warrender

Avra Gibbs Lamey and Mar Warrender

Update: Click here to read Anne DesBrisay’s (Ottawa Citizen’s restaurant critic) recent review of the Lindenhof. I completely forgot the Lindenhof’s new location was most recently the Four Cuisines Bistro.

Particulars:
The Lindenhof
268 Preston Street
(613)725-3481
Lindenhof on Urbanspoon

Mild-mannered IT professional by day and food blogger by night, I founded foodiePrints with a single intention, to share my love of all things food. My first post shared a recipe. Many followed. Eventually, I learned Ottawa prepares and serves great food. Thereafter, I started meeting restaurateurs, chefs, cooks, farmers, and other local producers, all good people. Ideas for food-related content swirled in my head. foodiePrints grew into a place to put them. From exploring foreign and domestic cuisines to shopping for exotic ingredients and cobbling together my takes on dishes in my meager kitchen, there are stories to tell. Welcome to foodiePrints. Here, you will find stories about food and drink, cooking, and eating in Canada’s capital. Be it food-related or just food-for-thought, I hope you find something tasty here.

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[...] and a good Korean restaurant (Le Kimchi). Formerly, there was a German restaurant on Preston, The Lindenhof. Recently, a smokehouse and sandwich shop opened on [...]

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