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Deviled Eggs for Gastropost

Oriental-Adulterated Deviled Eggs Oriental-Adulterated Deviled Eggs
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Loyal readers have likely noticed we routinely submit photos to the National Post’s #gastropost project. If you haven’t heard of gastropost, it is a Toronto-centric experiment from the National Post Labs. Its aim is to engage readers of the National Post’s print newspaper and encourage them to share their “expertise,” specifically in the food realm.

Hard copy media noticed there is a lot of citizen reporting when it comes to food? Since everybody “tweets their lunch,” why not exploit the free photo-journalism? Right? Not quite…

As Chris Tindal pointed out last June (2012) during gastropost’s launch, despite falling advertising revenue and shrinking budgets, traditional media still has life to it. Newspapers carry a level of legitimacy new media, with its smart-phone-equipped, snap-happy, and quick-to-tweet legions, has not yet earned. I argue something similar can be said about professional journalism. We inherently trust journalistic integrity, but are left to wonder when respected news brands knowingly publish controversial “link bait.” Cynicism aside, newspapers enjoy mass readership.

To demonstrate his point, Tindal asked rhetorically, on which National Post property would you prefer one of your photos be published, their website or their newspaper?

Gastropost works like this: a themed mission is issued Wednesday, usually moderated by the person who suggested it. Moderators have included National Post staff and fellow members of new media from recognizable Twitterati to bloggers. Participants submit photos, be they from their phones or fancier cameras, to a website setup in cooperation with Tumblr. The photos are immediately published on the gastropost Tumblr feed. National Post staffers sift through photos submitted between the official mission issue date and 10 am the following Wednesday. Chosen photos are published in a special two-page spread, specific to the Toronto-issue of the National Post.

This week, the mission involves eggs, “eat or cook something with eggs.” And, our observing Easter, said eggs don’t have to come from chickens.

My favourite egg-based application would have to be Mark Snyder’s breakfast pizza, which he served from his “The Flat Bread Pizza Company” operation at the Ottawa Farmer’s Market weekly last year.

Breakfast Pizza Served at the Ottawa Farmer's Market in Brewer Park

Breakfast Pizza Served at the Ottawa Farmer’s Market in Brewer Park


I really hope he returns this coming season (May – October, 2013).

But, Snyder’s breakfast pizza isn’t something I’ve eaten recently. Neither is it something I’ve cooked. Having made slow-risen pizza dough on rare occasions, I prefer to leave pizza, especially the “baked in a wood-fired oven” variety, to the pros. My insurance agent concurs.

So, I borrowed an idea from another local food enterprise’ Ottawa’s paragon of laid-back (read “casual” NOT hipster!) dining, Union Local 613 (315 Somerset Street W.). When Union opened, the restaurant that specializes in Canadian-takes on southern comfort fare (fried chicken, biscuits and gravy, shrimp and grits) served deviled eggs, made with Beking’s Poultry Farm‘s eggs. Sadly, “salad eggs” or “dressed eggs”, as they are called in some regions of the Southern and Midwestern United States, are no longer on the menu.

“Deviled” eggs, so named because of the characteristic “spicy” mustard added to the yolks, may date back to antiquity. Ancient Romans may have been the first to boil eggs; halve them; remove and adulterate the egg yolks with seasonings; and replace the yolks, using the whites as edible container and utensil.

Here is my take, employing some oriental adulteration, adding Japanese-style mayonnaise to the yolks and sprinkling crushed sriracha peas on top.

Oriental-Adulterated Deviled Eggs

Oriental-Adulterated Deviled Eggs

Not satisfied, I made gochujang roasted pork belly with which I finished my deviled eggs.

Korean-Inspired Adulteration

Korean-Inspired Adulteration

Korean-Inspired Deviled EggsKorean-Inspired Deviled Eggs

“If you’re gonna to devil ’em, let’s really devil ’em” Eggs
[Adapted from Kimchi Bacon Deviled Eggs from Momofuku for 2]

Adding gochujang to sliced pork belly

Adding gochujang to sliced pork belly

Sliced pork belly, marinating in gochujang

Sliced pork belly, marinating in gochujang

Gochujang-roasted pork belly

Gochujang-roasted pork belly

Crushed sriracha peas

Crushed sriracha peas

Japanese mayonnaise

Japanese mayonnaise

Egg yolks with chopped mint

Egg yolks with chopped mint

What You’ll Need:

  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 tbsp Japanese mayonnaise
  • 2 mint leaves
  • salt for seasoning
  • crushed sriracha peas for garnish
  • 2 pieces of gochujang-roasted (Korean chile paste) pork belly

Prep:

  1. If you choose not to purchase Japanese mayonnaise (Kewpie, being the most popular band), you can make it. In a blender, place one egg yolk, one egg, 3 tbsp apple cider vinegar, 1 tbsp lime juice, 1 tsp salt, and 1/4 tsp sugar. Pulse until well combined (5-7 times). Mix together 2 tsp sesame seed oil and 2 cups of a high smoke point, but neutral flavoured, oil like ground nut or safflower. Turn the blender on. Slowly add the oil to the blender.
  2. To make the gochujang-roasted pork belly, buy pre-sliced but uncured pork belly. Slather each slice with gochujang and leave marinate refrigerated for 3 hours; overnight is better. Remove excess gochujang from the slices and arrange them side-by-each on a broiling pan or rack set over a roasting pan to catch the drippings. Place everything into a cold oven. Set the oven to 400F. Start a timer for one hour.
  3. There are myriad ways to hard boil eggs. The fool proof method I use involves placing eggs from the fridge into a small pot, no more than 4 at a time. Add cold water from the tap, covering the eggs by an inch. Place the pot on a burner set to medium heat. Cover. Bring the water to a boil. Once the water reaches a boil, move the pot off the heat onto a cold burner. Set a timer for 12 minutes.
  4. Crush the sriracha peas in a mortar and pestle and set them aside.

When it comes to deviled eggs, the “devil” is in the details. Older eggs peel easier when hard cooked. Deviled eggs taste best when made with hard boiled eggs that are not over cooked. If you see green or grey between the yolk and white, your yolks will be chalky. Your whites are likely rubbery. I prefer my deviled eggs over stuffed, so always have whites leftover.

Method:

  1. Peel and halve your eggs length-wise.
  2. Carefully remove the yolks and place them in a metal mixing bowl.
  3. Finely chop your mint and add it to the bowl.
  4. Add the mayonnaise and combine everything together with a fork.
  5. Taste the mixture. Adjust the seasoning with salt, bearing in mind the eggs will be served slightly chilled.
  6. Over stuff 5 of your 6 with the yolk mixture. Find something to do with the 6th white.
  7. Sprinkle with yolk mixture with crushed sriracha peas.
  8. Top with a piece of gochujang-roasted pork belly.
  9. Serve slightly chilled. Do not serve deviled eggs cold.

How do these taste? Think “bacon ‘n eggs,” only with a kick!

Update: We showcased this dish on CTV Ottawa Morning Live, April 8th, 2013.

Gastroposted April 6, 2013

Gastroposted April 6, 2013

Mild-mannered IT professional by day and food blogger by night, I founded foodiePrints with a single intention, to share my love of all things food. My first post shared a recipe. Many followed. Eventually, I learned Ottawa prepares and serves great food. Thereafter, I started meeting restaurateurs, chefs, cooks, farmers, and other local producers, all good people. Ideas for food-related content swirled in my head. foodiePrints grew into a place to put them. From exploring foreign and domestic cuisines to shopping for exotic ingredients and cobbling together my takes on dishes in my meager kitchen, there are stories to tell. Welcome to foodiePrints. Here, you will find stories about food and drink, cooking, and eating in Canada’s capital. Be it food-related or just food-for-thought, I hope you find something tasty here.