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My Name is Cheesecake… Jarlsberg “Cotton-Style” Cheesecake #giveaway – updated

Jarlsberg Japanese-Style Cotton Cheesecake Jarlsberg Japanese-Style Cotton Cheesecake
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Ever since the Dairy Farmers of Canada‘s Anyday Magic challenge ended, I have been itching to work on a recipe project with a dairy product. Anyday Magic operated under the following parameters: there was a monthly challenge, usually themed like “Sunday brunch” or “party food”; participants signed on to compete with a maximum of three per individual “theme”; recipes had to employ cream (or milk), butter, or cheese, preferably Canadian; the Internet-going public weighed-in by voting for their favourite dish. Mostly, the prize was bragging rights. We at foodiePrints participated since the challenge’s inception, vowing to donate the pots and pans prize sets that were offered up towards the end to the Parkdale Food Centre.

When I saw the Jarlsberg recipe challenge in the Food Bloggers of Canada (FBC) newsletter, I jumped at the opportunity.

{Aside: And no, I don’t consider the contest speculative work. Working with a new-to-me-but-always-see-it-in-the-grocery-store cheese is fun to me!}

The following are the “judging” criteria:

  • Taste: 20%: Does this recipe showcase the flavour of Jarlsberg?
  • Visual Appeal: 20%: Does this recipe have enough visual appeal to be featured in a national advertising campaign?
  • Creativity: 20%: Does this recipe use Jarlsberg in an innovative and inspiring way?
  • Accessibility: 20%: Is the recipe easy to make, and does it use ingredients that the average home cook is familiar with, or can find easily?
  • Popular Appeal: 20%: Did this recipe receive an outstanding number of likes during the public voting period (from May 18 to May 25, 2015)

Fast forward a number of weeks. My dish made it into final round. It is presently being voted upon:

Jarlsberg Japanese-Style Cotton Cheesecake

Jarlsberg Japanese-Style Cotton Cheesecake

[Served with haskap berry jam and buttered graham cracker crumbs]

{Please click here and vote for it! I have very little chance of winning as mine is one of the longer recipes. On that note, I choose to keep my thoughts about the Eggs Benedict entry with non-hollandaise sauce to myself…}

Originally, I was going to submit a “quick ‘n easy shrimp” and grits dish. Working the Norwegian formulation of cow’s milk “gruyere” into baked grits, I would grill the shrimp (in a sweet sriracha) and plate with a sauce somewhat akin to the 1970s cocktail variety. Conceptually, it hits the trifecta: rich textures and strong flavours; sriracha-y (so hipster!); and obvious references to not one, but two classic dishes.

Then, I caught a glimpse of the pandemonium caused by Uncle Testsu Japanese Cheesecake on Bay Street in Toronto. Jenn and I were on a three-hour layover and rushing to Chinatown to meet a friend. The boisterous scene was insane! Apparently, lineups start forming an hour before the shop opens. There is a limit of one cheesecake purchase per person ($8.88 before taxes for a six-inch cake). People wait dutifully for at least 45 minutes for cheesecake that has largely been sold in T&T Chinese supermarkets for years, albeit in much smaller single-serving portions.

Japanese-style “Cotton” cheesecake is a souffle cheesecake. Its lighter than traditionally dense texture is due to the addition of whipped egg whites. My wife and I have been baking sponge cakes (including the angel food cake variation) and souffles for years. We have been experimenting with souffle cheesecakes.

So, experimentation began anew, replacing some of the characteristic cream cheese ingredient with Jarlesberg.

Experiment 1: Cottage Cheese Base

Draining Cottage Cheese

Draining Cottage Cheese

Milk and Butter

Milk and Butter

Straining Out the Unmelted Jarlsberg

Straining Out the Unmelted Jarlsberg

Folding Whipped Egg Whites into the Cake-Base

Folding Whipped Egg Whites into the Cake-Base

Result

Result

Experiment 2: Cream Cheese Base

Melted Cream Cheese Mixture

Melted Cream Cheese Mixture

Micro-planed Jarlsberg Cheese

Micro-planed Jarlsberg Cheese

Stir Until Melted

Stir Until Melted

Custard

Custard

Soft Peaks

Soft Peaks

Lightening the Custard

Lightening the Custard

Result

Result

The following are my lessons learned:

  • store-bought cream cheese is a wonderful thing; the stabilizers in the cream cheese will stabilize your cheesecake mixture
  • nutty and semi-firm gruyere-type cheeses melt more evenly if shredded finely; this is best accomplished with a micro plane grater
  • serve your cheesecake with buttered crumbs either cereal or graham crackers; think nostalgic textural cue
  • serve your cheesecake with a tart lower pectin (so runny) fruit jam to accentuate the sharpness and nuttiness of the cheese ingredients

Oh, and infusing grilled cheese flavour into the cheesecake base doesn’t work because of how little milk is employed.

Finely Shredded Jarlsberg

Finely Shredded Jarlsberg

Cheesy Bread

Cheesy Bread

Grilled Cheesy Bread

Grilled Cheesy Bread

Cubed Cheesy Bread

Cubed Cheesy Bread

Cheesy Bread Infusion

Cheesy Bread Infusion

Strain Out the Milk

Strain Out the Milk

Cheesy Toast Milk

Cheesy Toast Milk

Save that trick for making ice cream. Think grilled cheese-infused creme anglaise.

Jarlsberg Japanese-Style Cotton Cheesecake

Lightening the Egg Yolks

Lightening the Egg Yolks

Stiff Peaks

Stiff Peaks

Cake Base

Cake Base

Lined Cake Tin

Lined Cake Tin

Filling the Tin

Filling the Tin

Cake, Baked

Cake, Baked

Cake, Cooling

Cake, Cooling

What You’ll Need:

  • 125 g cream cheese, cubed (usually one package)
  • 100 g finely shredded Jarlsberg cheese
  • 60 g unsalted butter, cubed
  • 125 g whole milk (approximately 1/2 cup)
  • 120 g white granulated sugar, divided (2×60 g portions)
  • 6 large eggs, separated (whites and yolks)
  • 75 g cake flour
  • 35 g rice flour
  • 1 tsp lemon juice
  • 1 1/4 tsp cream of tartar (could substitute 1/2 tsp lemon juice)
  • more unsalted butter and sugar to coat an 8″ cake pan

Note: for an even lighter texture, increase the number of egg whites to 8 (so add the whites of two more large eggs)

Prep:

  1. Coat the sides of an 8″ cake pan with a thin layer of butter.
  2. Line the base and sides of the pan with parchment paper, so it towers over the wall of the pan.
  3. Place the prepared cake pan in the fridge.

Method:

  1. Select a stainless steel mixing bowl large enough to fit over the mouth of a medium-sized pot.
  2. Add 2-3 cm of water to the pot and place the pot on a burner set to medium-high heat.
  3. Bring the water up to a boil and reduce the heat to a simmer.
  4. Add the cream cheese, butter, and milk to the mixing bowl.
  5. Place the bowl over the pot and stir the mixture until it liquifies.
  6. When the cream cheese mixture is combined, add the shredded Jarlsberg a handful at a time, stirring to dissolve the cheese.
  7. Set the cheese mixture aside to cool.
  8. Preheat an oven to 400 F
  9. Add the egg yolks and half the sugar (60 g) to a larger mixing bowl.
  10. Whisk the egg yolk mixture together until it lightens in colour.
  11. Add the cooled cheese mixture and lemon juice, stirring to combine.
  12. Sieve the flour and starch into the cheese and egg mixture and stir just to moisten the flour.
  13. Strain the cheese, egg, and flour mixture into a clean bowl.
  14. Set the cheese, egg, and flour cake base aside.
  15. Using either an electric egg beater or stand mixer, whisk the egg whites until they froth and foam.
  16. Add the cream of tartar to the egg whites and continue whisking until they begin to grown in volume.
  17. Add the remaining sugar (60 g) to the the egg whites and continue whisking until they form stiff peaks (i.e. when the peaks stand up against their own weight).
  18. Add the beaten eggs whites to the cake base in 3 separate additions, folding them into the mixture with a spatula.
  19. Pour the lightened cake mixture into the prepared pan.
  20. Gently tap the pan gently against the counter top or sink once to remove any air bubbles.
  21. Place the pan in the 400 F oven and bake for 15 minutes.
  22. Then, turn the oven down to 325 F and bake for 30 minutes.
  23. Finally, turn the heat off and leave the cake in the oven for 30 minutes.
  24. De-pan the cake and chill it in the fridge for 2-3 hours before serving.
  25. Serve chilled.
Jarlsberg Japanese-Style Cotton Cheesecake

Jarlsberg Japanese-Style Cotton Cheesecake

[Served with buttered cereal crumb, granola, blueberries, and maple syrup]

The recipe creates a light texture. Eating it hot preserves more of the lighter texture. Eating it post-refrigeration results in a slightly denser texture.

Many wedges of Jarlsberg and bricks of cream cheese were sacrificed to make this cheesecake. Again, please vote for it by clicking here.

And, speaking of cheese, a giveaway follows:

Great Canadian Cheese Festival Sunday Tickets Giveaway, courtesy Top Shelf Preserves

The wonderful Sara Pishva of Top Shelf Preserves (founder and confectioner) is letting us give away a pair of Sunday tickets to The Great Canadian Cheese Festival that takes place from June 6th to 7th, 2015 at the Picton Fairgrounds in Prince Edward Country.

Sara Pishva of Top Shelf Preserves

Sara Pishva of Top Shelf Preserves

Do you love cheese? Have you participated in the slowly maturing tradition that is Canadian cheese?

Yes? No? But, what constitutes a cheese festival?

Well, that Sunday, there will be the Artisan cheese and Fine Food “Fair,” which involves dozens of exhibitors and 500 Canadian products (including wine and spirits vendors). Cheesewise, founder Georgs Kolesnikovs boasts there will be 150 artisan and farmstead cheeses on-hand from “30+ Canadian cheese-makers.” There will be cheese seminars presented by Dairy Farmers of Canada in the “All You Need is Cheese” annex. There will be live music. There will be a food court. Most importantly, there will be free parking.

Complementing the tickets, Pishva is also throwing in a jar of her Rhubarb Raisin Chutney, which she masterfully pairs with Le Bleu d’Elizabeth, an award-winning Quebec semi-soft blue-veined farm cheese.

“It’s so great with lots of different cheese though – smoked gouda, old cheddar, triple cream brie,” explains Pishva.

“I personally like it with something either really fatty or assertive (like blue).”

Needless to say, Top Shelf Preserves will be making a showing at the cheese festival.

Top Shelf Preserves

Top Shelf Preserves

So, standard giveaway protocol. Follow the Rafflecopter instructions.

Comment-wise, drop us a mention below with your favourite Canadian cheese. If you haven’t tried any of late, we highly recommend the cheese displays at Seed to Sausage General Store (729 Gladstone Avenue), The Piggy Market (400 Winston Avenue), and Epicuria Fine Food Store and Catering (357 St. Laurent Boulevard), which coincidentally also carry a selection of Top Shelf Preserves.

We will draw a winner for the pair of tickets using Random.org on Thursday, May 28, 2015 at midnight EST. We will notify Pishva via e-mail, cc-ing the winner (so please use a functional e-mail address when you comment). Both the tickets and the jar of rhubarb and raisin chutney will be available for pick up by the winner on Friday, May 29, 2015.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Update: This giveaway is closed. Based on the entries captured, we had to use a combination of Rafflecopter and comments to decide the winner. The winner drawn was “Jacquelne.” An e-mail has been dispatched. Thank-you to everyone who participated.

Mild-mannered IT professional by day and food blogger by night, I founded foodiePrints with a single intention, to share my love of all things food. My first post shared a recipe. Many followed. Eventually, I learned Ottawa prepares and serves great food. Thereafter, I started meeting restaurateurs, chefs, cooks, farmers, and other local producers, all good people. Ideas for food-related content swirled in my head. foodiePrints grew into a place to put them. From exploring foreign and domestic cuisines to shopping for exotic ingredients and cobbling together my takes on dishes in my meager kitchen, there are stories to tell. Welcome to foodiePrints. Here, you will find stories about food and drink, cooking, and eating in Canada’s capital. Be it food-related or just food-for-thought, I hope you find something tasty here.

Comments

Ottawa Limo Guy

This look unreal, cheesegasm!! How have I not found this blog before. Ottawa Limo Guy http://www.ottawalimo.org

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